Sunday, February 08, 2009

Psalms: Don’t belong to the wicked, belong to the Blessed Man!

Glen Scrivener writes about Psalms 1-2:

"The King is the one who meditates on the Law day and night. And then he is prosperous. Well we already know that from Psalm 1. In v3 we see that the Man becomes a prosperous tree (same word as in Joshua 1). And, as we flick back to Psalm 1, this tree imagery from v3 is often used to describe the promised King of Israel. The promised King is often called things like ‘The Branch’ or the Root or He’s likened to a vine.
When you put all this together you get the picture that the Man of Psalm 1 is in fact the King of Psalm 2. The Man of Psalm 1 is the Anointed One (or Messiah or Christ, it’s all the same word) from Psalm 2:2. The Man is the Christ, the Son of God. So you see in both Psalm 1 and Psalm 2 you have a contrast – not between one group of good guys and another group of bad guys. In both Psalms you have one man, the King, who is God’s Righteous, Anointed, Blessed, Beloved Son and then you have the wicked, the other kings of the earth, the sinners, the mockers, the rebels.
And the message of these Psalms is not ‘Don’t belong to the bad guys, belong to the good guys.’ The message of these Psalms is ‘Don’t belong to the wicked, belong to the Blessed Man.’ Belong to Christ, the Son of God. See, take the beginning and end of these two Psalms together and you get the whole message of the Bible in a nutshell. Psalm 1:1 ‘Blessed is the Man’ and Psalm 2:12 ‘Blessed are all those who take refuge in Him.’ That’s the gospel right there. Blessed is the Man and blessed are all those who take refuge in Him. Christ is the One Blessed Man, but He doesn’t keep His blessedness to Himself. It’s a blessing that’s available for all who come to Him."

And here's five mins on the same lines (not by Glen): Psalms are Christian:

11 comments:

  1. I've written a settign of Psalms 1-2 based along these lines.

    The chorus goes:

    The man is Jesus
    The man who always keeps god's law
    The man is Jesus
    The man is righteous in God's sight
    The man is Jesus who is blessed and so are those... who take their refuge in him.

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  2. so hang on Paul... who do you think the man?!

    Didn't Ps 1 and 2 used to be one psalm anyway?

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  3. Them basically being one Psalm is part of the argument for it... and that we risk a false gospel if we make us the man...

    I'm working on a more poetic version of that Huxley.

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  4. I do apologise Bish. I'm sorry it's not up to your predecessor's standards.But it sounds better sung.

    Ed - Jesus is the MAN, Ed, in case you were wondering. I hadn't really thought of it that way before - maybe I should paraphrase Psalm 2:1... instead of:

    "Why do the nations rage... against the Lord and against his anointed?"

    We can have:

    "Why do the nations stick it... to the man?..."

    For some reason I feel like Drew Hunt now. Is that a bad thing?

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  5. Seriously, yours is great. I've been working on my own since last Monday when we were looking at the Psalms as a team.

    The question is, not can you type like Drew, but do you look as cool as Drew?

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  6. Not in a million years could I ever be, look, swim or any other verb of your choosing as cool as Drew.

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  7. Thankfully there's room in The Man for all of us, not just the cool kids.

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  8. 'Stick it to the Man' is hilarious.

    Paul, Can we hear your Psalm settings anywhere?

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  9. Yeah, I'm not the man. Jesus is the man.

    So...

    What about Deuteronomy 6:4-9?

    Are we to be obedient to this or not?

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  10. Absolutely. As we worship Christ we are made into his image, which is a law-meditating, tree-with-streams-of-water, prospered by God image.

    I don't have a problem with a straightforward application of Psalm 1, contrasting the wicked and the righteous (those in Christ).

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  11. "I don't have a problem with a straightforward application of Psalm 1, contrasting the wicked and the righteous (those in Christ)."

    Neither do I. Provided (as always) that law-meditating, evil-avoiding is defined Christocentrically.

    And in context, neither does Glen over in the original article.

    All of which is slightly different to saying 'that we risk a false gospel if we make us the man...' isn't it?

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